Bob Rivers Comedy Corp. – “Yellow Snow! Yellow Snow! Yellow Snow!” – (1997)

Bob Rivers is really good at parody songs. This is obviously a parody of the classic “Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!” but it’s about dogs doing their business in the snow. I do like the lyrics “he’s a frisky little pooch Van Gogh.”

Trey Parker – “Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo” – (1999)

If you haven’t caught on, this week I’m featuring the most juvenile of all the Christmas songs I’ve got. Then don’t come stranger than this, I promise. The Mr. Hankey episode of South Park was actually from the series’ first season and it remains one its most classic and well-known episodes. Trust me, like most of the show, this song is hilarious if you’re 12. Anyway, I promise less toilet humor next week. Christmas songs don’t get weirder than this.

Richard Marx – “The Way She Loves Me” – (1994)

This was single #3 from Paid Vacation, which also featured “Now and Forever,” which turned out to be one of Richard Marx’s biggest this. This song is definitely in its shadow, but it’s more upbeat and fun. Yes, I just told you that a Richard Marx song is fun. It actually charted into the top 20 on the Hot 100 and #3 on the Adult Contemporary chart (which is more apt, as Richard Marx just about defines “Adult Contemporary in 1994”). Marx looks like Rob Lowe in this video.

Godsmack – “Whatever” – (1998)

This was Godsmack’s first single – and it remains one of their best-remembered songs. You can tell it was the first single but an up-and-coming rock band because the video is terrible: it’s the band playing a show at some outdoor venue. It’s quite typical of late-90s rock videos. This song was a top ten hit on the Mainstream Rock chart back in 1998.

Juvenile feat. Mannie Fresh & Lil Wayne – “Back That Thang Up” – (1998)

C’mon, you have to admit: that’s one of the work album covers you’ve ever seen. “Back That Thang Up” was the edited (and MTV-friendly) version of Juvenile’s “Back That Azz Up” (which we’ll feature at a later date). Notice that no matter what you are backing up, it is spelled incorrectly. This only made it to #15 on the Hot 100 (Juvenile would late have a #1) but this is definitely his signature song. This was actually a decent hit on TRL in 1999 and it marks an early appearance of Lil Wayne before he really got famous about five years later. His rap sort of marks the first major appearance of “drop it like it’s hot” – which I guess makes this a cultural landmark? Just kidding. Happy 4th of July.

Jon B. feat. Babyface – “Someone to Love” – (1995)

The dramatically goateed Jon B. had a #32 hit on the Hot 100 in 1995 with this duet with Babyface. It was included on the Bad Boys soundtrack and that was what caused it to be such a hit. Babyface was the driving force behind R&B in the 1990s, writing and producing over 25 #1 R&B hits. Having him included on your track was almost a guarantee for success. Kind of like Pharrell right now.

Celine Dion & Clive Griffin – “When I Fall in Love” – (1993)

Sleepless in Seattle may have been the defining “chick flick” or romantic comedy of the 90s. It was produced by David Foster and recorded by Celine Dion – who was coming on strong about this time – and Clive Griffin. Griffin’s spot was supposed to be Stevie Wonder, but I think that may have overshadowed everything. This is Griffin’s best-known work and biggest hit. This is a Grammy-winning song but it wasn’t eligible for an Oscar as it wasn’t original. The song appeared first on the Sleepless in Seattle soundtrack before coming out on Celine’s The Colour of My Love later that year.

Mariah Carey feat. Joe & 98 Degrees – “Thank God I Found You” – (1999)

This song is from Mariah Carey’s “Whisper Period” – those years in the late 1990s/early 2000s where she barely made any noise on any of her songs and it just sounds like she’s humming words in the next room. Fortunately, this track features boy band 98 Degrees and late-90s R&B dude Joe to provide actual lyrics. Because it is a Mariah Carey song technically from the 90s, it obviously went to #1. But it’s by no means the best of them.

Patty Smyth & Don Henley – “Sometimes Love Just Ain’t Enough” – (1992)

I could’ve sworn this song was from the 80s. Nope – 1992. But hey, adult contemporary from the early 1990s might as well have been from the 80s because it all sounds very similar. Also, let’s note that this is by Patty Smyth, former lead singer of Scandal and not Patti Smith, the punk singer. Big distinction. And of course, Don Henley, the Eagle. This was an Adult Contemporary #1 and a #2 on the Hot 100. And I’ve always thought Patty Smyth sounds like a country singer in this song. Am I crazy?

Glenn Medeiros & Bobby Brown – “She Ain’t Worth It” – (1990)

This was a #1 hit for Glenn Medeiros (and Bobby Brown). His successful years were between 1984 and 1993. After that, he became a teacher and currently is a vice-principal at a school in Hawaii. How about that for a career turn? Imagine having a teacher who had a huge radio smash. This song is a good example of early-90s R&B/new jack swing. I like it (although I don’t care for Bobby Brown’s rap verse).

Salt-n-Pepa with En Vogue – “Whatta Man” – (1993)

This is one of the most popular songs by either Salt-n-Pepa or En Vogue (the best girl group the 90s, sorry TLC). “What a Man” was originally recorded as a soul track in 1968 by Linda Lyndell. En Vogue covered it and layered a Salt-n-Pepa rap over top of it to generate a top three hit on the Hot 100. It was also nominated for a Grammy. It’s an awesome 90s track.

Brandy & Monica – “The Boy is Mine” – (1998)

Here’s one of the greatest R&B songs of the 90s. Man I loved this song when it came out and have no idea how it wasn’t included in the top 50 in our 200 Best Songs of the 90s countdown. I messed that one up. The song was released on albums by both Brandy and Monica (Brandy first, hence her album over there at left). The song was a Hot 100 #1 for 13 weeks over the summer of 1998. It was everywhere. It won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group and was nominated for Record of the Year. Awesome, awesome song.

Gloria Estefan & ‘N Sync – “Music of My Heart” – (1999)

There are two big names behind this song. No, not Gloria Estefan and ‘N Sync – but Diane Warren and David Foster. If you don’t know who they are, look them up as their hit-writing/producing ability is pretty strong. This song was nominated for two Grammys and an Oscar. It was a #2 hit on the Hot 100 and as I’ve had a 90s music listening resurgence lately (this includes a lot of ‘N Sync on my car radio) – I must say, this song is pretty good. Although Joey Fatone’s super red hair in the video really isn’t.

Celine Dion & R. Kelly – “I’m Your Angel” – (1998)

This #1 hit from late 1998 appeared on albums by both Celine Dion and R. Kelly. It was the first #1 that took Billboard’s new rules into account regarding tracks that were never officially released as a single (otherwise referred to as “airplay-only”). This is neither artist’s best song although even if it was a big smash.

Shania Twain & Bryan White – “From This Moment On” – (1997)

This song was written by Shania Twain and perennial hit-writer “Mutt” Lange. Originally, it was going to be a duet between Twain and Elton John but they ended up recording it with country singer Bryan White instead and this has to be his biggest hit. The song was an adult contemporary #1 (duets really heat up the A/C chart). It hit #6 on the country chart and #4 on the Hot 100. Shania was the crossover queen of the 90s.

Eric Benet & Faith Evans – “Georgy Porgy” – (1999)

Cover songs have their place – sometimes they are a terrible idea and sometimes they make a good case for themselves. This is an really chill version of Toto’s 1978 hit (I hate myself for saying “chill” but I don’t know how else to put it). The very talented Eric Benet teamed with Faith Evans to cover this in 1999. It only made it to #55 in the U.S. – but it was a #2 hit in New Zealand.

Luther Vandross & Mariah Carey – “Endless Love” – (1994)

Didn’t we feature “Endless Love” a few weeks ago? Um, yeah. But it’s one of those songs that has been covered and covered. Instead of Lionel Richie we have the also-supremely-talented Luther Vandross and in place of Diana Ross we have the possibly-more-talented Mariah Carey (from a solo-career perspective). This was released on a Luther Vandross album and on Mariah’s Greatest Hits album seven years later. It was a #2 on the Hot 100 and is almost as good as the original.

George Michael & Elton John – “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” – (1991)

Obviously this song was a big hit for Elton John in 1974, reaching #2 on the Hot 100. In 1991, he and George Michael performed the song as a duet during the Live Aid concert. This version went to #1 on the Hot 100 and on charts around the world. This version was included on Elton John’s 1993 album Duets. The first part of the song is George Michael just blowing everyone away with incredible vocals and then he brings out Elton who kills it. This is an amazing version. It’s two incredible voices battling it out and we all win.

Natalie & Nat King Cole – “Unforgettable” – (1991)

This song was one of Nat King Cole’s biggest hits and most well-known signature songs. Natalie Cole was 15 when her father, Nat King Cole, passed away. She’s a pretty incredible talent in her own right, even if her father’s shadow is rather large. Well, in 1991 she released an album of covers of her father’s material. This track was edited as a duet with his classic rendition. The album went on to win a Grammy for Album of the Year and is certified 7x platinum. It’s an amazing song.

Gerald Levert & Eddie Levert Sr. – “Already Missing You” – (1995)

Eddie Levert was the lead singer of the O’Jays in the 1970s and his son Gerald was a songwriter and performer in his own right who was also a member of LSG (with Johnny Gill and Keith Sweat) in the 90s. With his father, Gerald released two albums (one posthumously). Father & Son was released in 1995. This song peaked at #7 on the R&B chart in 1995. Gerald died at age 40 in 2006.

Donna Lewis & Richard Marx – “At the Beginning” – (1997)

I will admit – I really liked this song when it came out and I haven’t heard it in a while. And I will also admit that as soon as it started I remember why I liked it so much the first time around. This song did okay on the Adult Contemporary chart and showed that Disney didn’t have a stranglehold on original songs in animated films (this one came from Anastasia and most of what I remember from the movie is that Hank Azaria did a voice and it was awesome). Good song – I don’t care if you mock me.

Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart, & Sting – “All For Love” – (1993)

The movie was The Three Musketeers and I guess Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart, and Sting were supposed to be the musical equivalent of the Three Musketeers? Maybe in 1993. Now it seems a little absurd. Let’s look at where they are now: Bryan Adams has all but disappeared off the face of the Earth after a fairly decent and long career. Sting is still a fairly well-liked and well-respected public figure, but he doesn’t put out a lot of new radio-friendly music these days. And Rod Stewart stopped singing original songs over a decade ago – releasing CD after CD of standards. This was a #1 hit on the Hot 100. The title is inspired by the Three Musketeers motto “All for one, and one for all” and was transposed into this romantic soft rock song. Ooookay.

Michael Jackson & Janet Jackson – “Scream” – (1995)

This is a brother and sister duet. Many people think Michael Jackson peaked in the 80s and while that might be true, his stuff from the 90s was awesome. At the time, this was the highest debuting single on the Hot 100 ever – jumping in at #5 (where it peaked). It’s about the tabloids that were all over Michael after his alleged child abuse among other things. It was nominated from a Grammy and one of the best remembered things about this song was the video. It was considered the most expensive music video ever made – costing over $7 million in 1995. Which is insane. In all reality, it’s probably more memorable than the song itself.

Brian Setzer Orchestra – “Hey, Louis Prima” – (1996)

Guitar Slinger was Brian Setzer’s 1996 album – his second studio album and the one released right before they hit it big in the swing revival craze of the late-1990s. As most of his albums have been, it was a mix of original and covered material. “Hey, Louis Prima” was an original song written by Setzer that shows off his impressive guitar skills. It’s also a bit of foreshadowing as his cover of Louis Prima’s “Jump, Jive An’ Wail” would take him to the stratosphere of pop music two years later.

Pearl Jam – “Black” – (1991)

Pearl Jam was one of the most important bands of the 1990s and one of the biggest in the grunge scene – even if Nirvana gets so much of the credit. “Black” was the fifth track on Ten – one of the best/most-important albums of the decade. This reached #3 on the Mainstream Rock chart and if you want an example of classic grunge music – it doesn’t come much better than this. It remains one of their best-known and most well-received songs despite the fact that it was never released as a single.